What Parents Don't Know - Netflix

Kids test their parents with trivia and physical challenges.

What Parents Don't Know - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2016-09-04

What Parents Don't Know - Helicopter parent - Netflix

A helicopter parent (also called a cosseting parent or simply a cosseter) is a parent who pays extremely close attention to a child's or children's experiences and problems, particularly at educational institutions. Helicopter parents are so named because, like helicopters, they hover overhead, overseeing their child's life.

What Parents Don't Know - Literature - Netflix

Madeline Levine has written on helicopter parenting. Judith Warner recounts Levine's descriptions of parents who are physically “hyper-present” but psychologically absent. Katie Roiphe, commenting on Levine's work in Slate elaborates on myths about helicopter parenting: “[I]t is about too much presence, but it's also about the wrong kind of presence. In fact, it can be reasonably read by children as absence, as not caring about what is really going on with them ... As Levine points out, it is the confusion of overinvolvement with stability.” Similarly, she reminds readers that helicopter parenting is not the product of “bad or pathetic people with deranged values ... It is not necessarily a sign of parents who are ridiculous or unhappy or nastily controlling. It can be a product of good intentions gone awry, the play of culture on natural parental fears.” The Chinese parenting style depicted in the book Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother has been compared to western helicopter parenting. Nancy Gibbs writing for Time magazine described them both as “extreme parenting”, although she noted key differences between the two. Gibbs describes Tiger Mothers as focused on success in precision-oriented fields such as music and math, while helicopter parents are “obsessed with failure and preventing it at all costs”. Another difference she described was the Tiger Mother's emphasis on hard work with parents adopting an “extreme, rigid and authoritarian approach” toward their children, which she contrasts to western helicopter parents who she says “enshrine their children and crave their friendship”. Former Stanford dean Julie Lythcott-Haims, drawing from her experiences seeing students come in academically prepared but not prepared to fend for themselves, wrote a book called How to Raise an Adult, in which she urges parents to avoid “overhelping” their children.

What Parents Don't Know - References - Netflix