The Kandi Factory - Netflix

The series follows Kandi Burruss as she assists 16 aspiring artists jump-start their dreams of success in the music industry.

The Kandi Factory - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2013-04-09

The Kandi Factory - Queer Eye - Netflix

Queer Eye is an American reality television series that premiered on the cable television network Bravo in July 2003. Originally Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, the title was later shortened to broaden the overall scope. The series was created by executive producers David Collins and Michael Williams along with David Metzler through their company, Scout Productions. The premise relies on the stereotype of gay (queer) men as experts in matters of fashion, style, personal grooming, interior design, and culture. Each episode features a team collectively known as the “Fab Five” performing a makeover (in the parlance of the show, a “make-better”), usually for a heterosexual (straight) man: revamping wardrobe, redecorating, and offering advice on grooming, lifestyle, and food. Queer Eye for the Straight Guy quickly became a surprise success, resulting in merchandising, franchising of the concept internationally, and a woman-oriented spin-off, Queer Eye for the Straight Girl. Queer Eye won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Reality Program in 2004. The series' name was abbreviated to Queer Eye at the beginning of its third season to include making over individuals regardless of gender or sexual orientation. Queer Eye ended production during June 2006 and the final episode aired on October 30, 2007. During September 2008, the Fine Living Network briefly aired Queer Eye in syndication. Netflix announced in January 2017 that it was reviving the series with a new Fab Five in a season of eight episodes. On February 7, 2018, the revival aired its first season to positive reviews.

The Kandi Factory - Popular and critical response - Netflix

Queer Eye for the Straight Guy debuted on July 15, 2003 and the series quickly attained high ratings, peaking during September of that year with 3.34 million viewers per episode. The popularity of the series established the Fab Five as media celebrities, with high-profile appearances at the Emmys and a “make-better” of Jay Leno and his The Tonight Show set in August of that year. Fab Five members parlayed their celebrity into endorsement deals, notably Thom Filicia's becoming the spokesperson for Pier 1 Imports. The American press almost universally complimented the series and the Fab Five. Out magazine listed the Fab Five in its “OUT 100”, the “greatest gay success stories” of 2003. Instinct magazine declared Kressley one of the “Leading Men” of 2004. The series attracted criticism for making generalizations about sexual identity, namely that homosexual men are inherently more fashionable and stylish than heterosexuals. Among those making this critique were Tom Shales in the Washington Post (“stereotypes on parade”), Richard Goldstein in Village Voice (“Haven't fags always been consigned to the role of body servant?”) and United States Congressman Barney Frank speaking to the New York Post. With the success of the first season, original “culture guy” Blair Boone sued the show for breach of contract, claiming he should be paid not just for two episodes but for the season that he had been contracted to film. The popularity of the series inspired a number of parodies. Comedy Central hosted a satirical television series named Straight Plan for the Gay Man, which featured four heterosexual men teaching homosexual men how to be more stereotypically straight, redecorating their homes with neon beer signs and teaching them about sports. South Park spoofed the show and its hosts in the episode “South Park Is Gay!”, in which the protagonists learn that the Fab Five are actually evil Crab People trying to control the world by converting heterosexual men into metrosexuals. Queer Eye won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Reality Program during 2004 and was nominated for another Emmy in the same category during 2005. The series also received GLAAD Media Awards for Outstanding Reality Program during 2004 and 2005, and was nominated for a third during 2006. In the second season, ratings decreased, averaging about 1.8 million viewers per episode with an average of 804,000 viewers in the important 18-40 demographic. New episodes continued to be broadcast for two more seasons. Bravo confirmed in early 2007 that Queer Eye had been cancelled. The remaining fifth-season episodes were billed as Queer Eye: The Final Season and aired twice weekly beginning October 2, 2007.

The Kandi Factory - References - Netflix