Rustic Renovation - Netflix

In Minnesota, just about everyone owns a cabin whether it's on the water or buried deep in the woods. And while some are worn down after years of neglect, others were just poorly built in the first place. With so many people in need of restoration work, it can be big business for builders with the skill and style. In Prior Lake, Minnesota, Chase and Brock Jurgensen are those builders. Chase heads up the projects and big brother Brock finds creative uses for reclaimed wood in each build. Together they are a dream team that can transform any old lodge into a new functional and beautiful home in the wild. The duo takes over DIY Network's Facebook page to introduce their new series, Rustic Renovation.

Rustic Renovation - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2017-07-11

Rustic Renovation - Hameau de la Reine - Netflix

The Hameau de la Reine (French pronunciation: ​[amo də la ʁɛn], The Queen's Hamlet) is a rustic retreat in the park of the Château de Versailles built for Marie Antoinette in 1783 near the Petit Trianon in Yvelines, France. It served as a private meeting place for the Queen and her closest friends, a place of leisure. Designed by the Queen's favoured architect, Richard Mique with the help of the painter Hubert Robert, it contained a meadowland with lakes and streams, a classical Temple of Love on an island with fragrant shrubs and flowers, an octagonal belvedere, with a neighbouring grotto and cascade. There are also various buildings in a rustic or vernacular style, inspired by Norman or Flemish design, situated around an irregular pond fed by a stream that turned a mill wheel. The building scheme included a farmhouse, (the farm was to produce milk and eggs for the queen), a dairy, a dovecote, a boudoir, a barn that burned down during the French Revolution, a mill and a tower in the form of a lighthouse. Each building is decorated with a garden, an orchard or a flower garden. The largest and most famous of these houses is the “Queen's House”, connected to the Billiard house by a wooden gallery, at the center of the village. A working farm was close to the idyllic, fantasy-like setting of the Queen’s Hamlet. The hameau is the best-known of a series of rustic garden constructions built at the time, notably the Prince of Condé's Hameau de Chantilly (1774–1775) which was the inspiration for the Versailles hamlet. Such model farms, operating under principles espoused by the Physiocrats, were fashionable among the French aristocracy at the time. One primary purpose of the hameau was to add to the ambiance of the Petit Trianon, giving the illusion that it was deep in the countryside rather than within the confines of Versailles. The rooms at the hameau allowed for more intimacy than the grand salons at Versailles or at the Petit Trianon.

Abandoned after the French Revolution, it was renovated in the late 1990s and is open to the public.

Rustic Renovation - Mill - Netflix

The Mill, built and fitted from 1783 to 1788, was never used for grinding grain, contrary to what is often argued. The wheel is driven by a stream derived from the Grand Lake and is only a decorative element. No mechanism or wheel were installed in the factory. The interior decoration was simple and neat. This structure is one of the most picturesque of the Hamlet. Each façade of the building is decorated slightly differently. This mill also served as a laundry.

Rustic Renovation - References - Netflix