Risking It All - Netflix

Three families not only unplug their smartphones and tablets, but they also give up electricity and running water for a life off the grid in a drastic last resort to reconnect with each other. From attempting to save their marriage to dealing with family illness to regaining control of their relationships, each family has a different reason for embarking on the journey of a lifetime. The three families pack up their homes, say their good-byes to loved ones, and prepare for the challenges that come with trading in the luxuries of modern-day society for a self-sufficient life.

Risking It All - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2014-11-18

Risking It All - Risk - Netflix

Risk is the potential of gaining or losing something of value. Values (such as physical health, social status, emotional well-being, or financial wealth) can be gained or lost when taking risk resulting from a given action or inaction, foreseen or unforeseen (planned or not planned). Risk can also be defined as the intentional interaction with uncertainty. Uncertainty is a potential, unpredictable, and uncontrollable outcome; risk is a consequence of action taken in spite of uncertainty. Risk perception is the subjective judgment people make about the severity and probability of a risk, and may vary person to person. Any human endeavour carries some risk, but some are much riskier than others.

Risking It All - Fear, anxiety and risk - Netflix

According to one set of definitions, fear is a fleeting emotion ascribed to a particular object, while anxiety is a trait of fear (this is referring to “trait anxiety”, as distinct from how the term “anxiety” is generally used) that lasts longer and is not attributed to a specific stimulus (these particular definitions are not used by all authors cited on this page). Some studies show a link between anxious behaviour and risk (the chance that an outcome will have an unfavorable result). Joseph Forgas introduced valence based research where emotions are grouped as either positive or negative (Lerner and Keltner, 2000). Positive emotions, such as happiness, are believed to have more optimistic risk assessments and negative emotions, such as anger, have pessimistic risk assessments. As an emotion with a negative valence, fear, and therefore anxiety, has long been associated with negative risk perceptions. Under the more recent appraisal tendency framework of Jennifer Lerner et al., which refutes Forgas' notion of valence and promotes the idea that specific emotions have distinctive influences on judgments, fear is still related to pessimistic expectations. Psychologists have demonstrated that increases in anxiety and increases in risk perception are related and people who are habituated to anxiety experience this awareness of risk more intensely than normal individuals. In decision-making, anxiety promotes the use of biases and quick thinking to evaluate risk. This is referred to as affect-as-information according to Clore, 1983. However, the accuracy of these risk perceptions when making choices is not known.

Risking It All - References - Netflix