Megacities - Netflix

Megacities takes a revolutionary look at the places where most of us live: the modern metropolis. The key to a city's survival is its vital organs - power grids, transportation systems, water supplies, air traffic control and countless others. Behind each system that we take for granted lies the huge infrastructure of a mega city. Visit eight iconic cities around the world: Las Vegas, Mexico City, Hong Kong, London, Paris, Sao Paulo, Mumbai and New York.

Megacities - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2005-09-18

Megacities - Megacity - Netflix

A megacity is a very large city, typically with a total population in excess of 10 million people. Precise definitions vary: the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs in its 2014 “World Urbanization Prospects” report counted urban agglomerations having over 10 million inhabitants. A University of Bonn report held that they are “usually defined as metropolitan areas with a total population of 10 million or more people”. Others list cities satisfying criteria of either 5 or 8 million and also have a population density of 2,000 per square kilometre. A megacity can be a single metropolitan area or two or more metropolitan areas that converge. The terms conurbation, metropolis, and metroplex are also applied to the latter. The term metacity has been used to describe metropolitan conurbations containing over 20 million people. As of 2017, there are 47 megacities in existence. Most of these urban agglomerations are in China and other countries of Asia. The largest are the metropolitan areas of Tokyo, Shanghai, and Jakarta, each having over 30 million inhabitants. China alone has 15 megacities, and India has six. South America has five; Africa, Europe, and North America have three each.

Megacities - Gentrification - Netflix

Gentrification and urban gentrification denote the socio-cultural changes in an area resulting from wealthier people buying housing property in a less prosperous community. Consequent to gentrification, the average income increases and average family size decreases in the community, which may result in the informal economic eviction of the lower-income residents, because of increased rents, house prices, and property taxes. This type of population change reduces industrial land use when it is redeveloped for commerce and housing. In addition, new businesses, catering to a more affluent base of consumers, tend to move into formerly blighted areas, further increasing the appeal to more affluent migrants and decreasing the accessibility to less wealthy natives.

Megacities - References - Netflix