End Times Girls Club - Netflix

End Times Girls Club is a hybrid comedy series and is your ultimate guide to apocalypse survival. Driven by her personal paranoia, Rose – played by creator and writer Rose Schlossberg – is here to educate girls on how to prepare for the end of the world and stay cute in the process!

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: None

End Times Girls Club - Stupid Girls - Netflix

“Stupid Girls” is a song recorded by American singer-songwriter Pink from her fourth studio album I'm Not Dead (2006). It was released in February 2006 as the first single from her third studio album by LaFace Records. The song marked Pink's return to LaFace Records under Zomba Label Group via Sony BMG, after Arista Records consolidated LaFace's operations into its own in mid-2001. “Stupid Girls” was written by Pink, Billy Mann, Niklas Olovson, and Robin Mortensen Lynch, Mann and MachoPsycho both produced the track. Recorded in 2005, the song introduces a more provocative, feminist, and explicit side of Pink, it lyrically condemns sexism and motivates intelligence in women. The song was well received by critics for its sound, its lyrical content, and that it was “sexy”. Due to the lyrical content, Zomba Label Group (a division of Sony BMG) was reluctant to release the song as the first single, until finally the officials saw the music video for the song and decided to release the music video first before soliciting the track to radio markets. According to Zomba, over eight million people downloaded the video immediately after it was available online, but also “went online to download the audio from the video in order to get it on radio”. The song was also responsible for reviving her popularity, following her decline between 2003 and 2005, reaching the top ten in fifteen countries, including the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and majority of Europe. The song was a moderate success in the United States, reaching the position of thirteen and the top forty on its component charts. A music video was filmed and premiered on MTV's Overdrive in January 2006. It features Pink as a variety of roles, both as an angel and a demon, variety of celebrities, a random woman getting plastic surgery, a lady with a purging disorder, and others. The song earned Pink a nomination for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance at the 2007 Grammy Awards.

End Times Girls Club - Critical reception - Netflix

The single was praised by Harry Potter author J. K. Rowling on her official website. She wrote, “'Stupid Girls', is the antidote-anthem for everything I had been thinking about women and thinness.” About.com praised the song and highlighted it: "she has rarely been as pointed in her socio-political views as in the hit “Stupid Girls” (...) “Stupid Girls” is musically a dance/hip hop gem." Allmusic praised her delivery when she's taunting and teasing this song and it was titled as one of the standouts on the album. Entertainment Weekly noted that this song has some verve. The Guardian was less positive, noting that her vocals are as superficial as the starlets she attacks. LA Times wrote that this song fuses many genres greatly and called it “hilarious feminist romp.” Jon Pareles was favorable: “the pop-reggae of Stupid Girls snidely dismisses the bimbos she sees everywhere, though she apparently has studied their habits closely.” PopMatters was positive: "On “Stupid Girlz”, she rails against the idea that women have to choose between being smart and being sexy, as if the two are mutually exclusive. Sal Cinqeman was favorable, too: "As always, Pink's ragged vocals are better than she's often given credit for and there's still a rebel sensibility, at least lyrically, on the catchy lead single “Stupid Girls” (“Where, oh where, have all the smart people gone?” she begs, lambasting “porno paparazzi girls”—which would have made for a more fun title—the way she took aim at Britney two albums ago)." Rolling Stone praised the collaboration with Lilith Fair and added that she takes on 'stupid girls' with these lyrics “What happened to the dream of a girl president?/She's dancing in the video next to 50 Cent.” Feminist website Feminspire were considerably more critical, naming the song in 2014 as one of “the top ten most sexist songs that aren't rap or hip hop from the last 20 years”. Author Noor Al-Sibai remarked that: “Pink shits on these women who are too stupid to break out of the chains of patriarchy by harshly judging their promiscuity and blaming them for 'giving in' to sexist tropes. Because obviously, women are to blame for their sexist objectification.”

End Times Girls Club - References - Netflix