Bamse - Netflix

When Bamse eats Grandma's remarkable thunder-honey, he becomes the world's strongest bear. He is always the world's kindest bear. Together with his friends Little Frisky (Lille Skutt) and Professor Shellback (Skalman) he goes out on many exciting adventures.

Bamse - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: Swedish

Status: Ended

Runtime: 15 minutes

Premier: 1966-10-29

Bamse - St. Bernard (dog) - Netflix

The St. Bernard or St Bernard (UK: , US: ) is a breed of very large working dog from the western Alps. They were originally bred for rescue at the Great St Bernard Pass on the Italian-Swiss border, and Little St Bernard Pass in the Italian-French border, located close to one another. The two hospices were built and run by the same monk brotherhood. The breed has become famous through tales of alpine rescues, as well as for its enormous size.

Bamse - History - Netflix

The ancestors of the St. Bernard share a history with the Sennenhunds. The St. Bernard, also called Alpine Mountain Dogs or Alpine Cattle Dogs, are the large farm dogs of the farmers and dairymen of most notably the French Alps, livestock guardians, herding dogs, and draft dogs as well as hunting dogs, search and rescue dogs, and watchdogs. These dogs are thought to be descendants of molosser type dogs brought into the Alps by the ancient Romans, and the St. Bernard is recognized internationally today as one of the Molossoid breeds. The earliest written records of the St. Bernard breed are from monks at the Great St Bernard Hospice at the Great St. Bernard Pass in 1707, with paintings and drawings of the dog dating even earlier. The most famous St. Bernard to save people at the pass was Barry (sometimes spelled Berry), who reportedly saved somewhere between 40 and 100 lives. There is a monument to Barry in the Cimetière des Chiens, and his body was preserved in the Natural History Museum in Berne. Another famous dog was Rutor, the faithful companion of the priest Pierre Chanoux, who was named after the peak Tête du Rutor located above the Little St Bernard pass. The classic St. Bernard looked very different from the St. Bernard of today because of cross-breeding. Severe winters from 1816 to 1818 led to increased numbers of avalanches, killing many of the dogs used for breeding while they were performing rescues. In an attempt to preserve the breed, the remaining St. Bernards were crossed with Newfoundlands brought from the Colony of Newfoundland in the 1850s, and so lost much of their use as rescue dogs in the snowy climate of the alps because the long fur they inherited would freeze and weigh them down. The dogs never received any special training from the monks. Instead, younger dogs would learn how to perform search and rescue operations from older dogs. The Swiss St. Bernard Club was founded in Basel on 15 March 1884. The St. Bernard was the very first breed entered into the Swiss Stud Book in 1884, and the breed standard was finally approved in 1888. Since then, the breed has been a Swiss national dog. The dogs at the St Bernard hospice were working dogs that were smaller than today's show St Bernard's dogs. Originally about the size of a German Shepherd Dog, the St Bernard grew to the size of today's dog as kennel clubs and dog shows emphasized appearance over the dog's working ability, along with a closed stud book. An open stud book would have allowed breeders to correct such errors by breeding in Working dogs of other dog breeds.

Bamse - References - Netflix